kernel news – 25.11.2013

Posted: November 25, 2013 in kernel

-Jon Mason has NTB fixes and updates:

NTB driver bug fixes to address a missed call to pci_enable_msix,
NTB-RP Link Up issue, Xeon Doorbell errata workaround, ntb_transport
link down race, and correct dmaengine_get/put usage. Also, clean-ups
to remove duplicate defines and document a hardware errata. Finally,
some changes to improve performance.

-Frederic Weisbecker has POSIX CPU timers cleanups aimed at 3.14 :

This is another series of posix cpu timers cleanups. Note it’s essentially the same
as: “posix-timers: Various cleanups” at http://lkml.org/lkml/2013/10/12/107 which
Peter Zijlstra had a look into. He told me that it looked ok. This version brings
almost no code change (just fix a NULL check ommitted somewhere), it’s mostly a rebase
against 2.6.12 with refined changelogs.

It’s a first pile but more is to come, as I have some more cleanups in mind. Plus
I plan to integrate more fixes from Kosaki Motohiro.

-Sage Weil with Ceph updates and fixes:

I just returned from two weeks off the grid to discover I’d miscalculated
and just missed the merge window. If you’re feeling inclined, there are a
few non-fixes mixed into this this request (improved readv/writev, nicer
behavior for unlinked files) that can be pulled from here:

git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/sage/ceph-client.git for-linus

If not, I have a fixes only branch here:

git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/sage/ceph-client.git for-linus-bugs-only

These include a couple fixes to the new fscache code that went in during
the last cycle (which will need to go stable@ shortly as well), a couple
client-side directory fragmentation fixes, a fix for a race in the cap
release queuing path, and a couple race fixes in the request abort
and resend code.

Obviously some of this could have gone into 3.12 final, but I preferred to
overtest rather than send things in for a late -rc, and then my travel
schedule intervened–my apologies there.

-So, as the title of the e-mail from Linus says, “Linux 3.13-rc1 is out”:

So you had an extra week to prepare your pull requests, and if you
were planning on sending it in the last two days thinking I’d close
the merge window on Sunday as usual, I can only laugh derisively in
your general direction, and call you bad names. Because I’m not
interested in your excuses. I did warn people about this in the 3.12
release notes. As it was, there were a few people who cut it fairly
close today. You know who you are.

If there are pull requests I missed (due to getting caught in spam
filters, or not matching my normal search patterns), and you think you
sent your pull request in time but it got overlooked, ping me –
because I don’t have anything pending I know about, but mistakes
happen.

Talking about mistakes… I suspect it was a mistake to have that
extra week before the merge window opened, and I probably should just
have done a 3.12-rc8 instead. Because the linux-next statistics look
suspicious, and we had extra stuff show up there not just in that
first week. Clearly people took that “let’s have an extra week of
merge window” and extrapolated it a bit too much. Oh, well. Live and
learn.

Anyway, other than that small oddity, this was a fairly normal merge
window. By patch size we had a pretty usual ~55% drivers, 18%
architecture code, 9% network updates, and the rest is spread out (fs,
headers, tools, documentation). Featurewise, the big ones are likely
the nftables and the multi-queue block layer stuff, but depending on
your interests you might find all the incremental updates to various
areas interesting. There are some odd ones in there (LE mode Powerpc
support..)

Go forth and test, and start sending me regression fixes. And really,
if you didn’t send me your pull request in time, don’t whine about it.
Because nobody likes a whiner.

Shortlog of merges appended. The real shortlog is much too big to be
readable, as always for rc1.

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